You’re invited to RELAY FOR LIFE  of Middletown,

Help us Tackle Cancer in 2010

To be held @ Mater Dei H.S. Football Field

538 Church St, New Monmouth, NJ

Friday 6/18/10-6/19/2010

 

MIDDLETOWN, NJ - Relay For Life is an overnight  family event in the fight against cancer.  We honor survivors, support those currently experiencing and remember those we lost to this horrible disease that takes so much!

Form and/or join a team @ www.relayforlife.org/middletownnj

Volunteers always needed

email Lisa Torres @ rmcsurvivor4life@aol.com for more information or call 1-800-ACS-2345 and ask for Amy Nolan of the Shrewsbury, NJ office.

Come to one of our meetings and see what Relay is all about and how you can make a difference in your community!

4/19/10- Team Meeting @ Mater Dei Cafeteria 6:30 pm

5/4/10 – Committee/Volunteer Meeting @ ACS, Shrewsbury, 6:30pm

5/17/10 – Team Meeting @ Mater Dei Cafeteria, 6:30pm

 

What is Relay For Life?

The American Cancer Society Relay For Life is a life-changing event that gives everyone in communities across the globe a chance to celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost, and fight back against the disease. At Relay, teams of people camp out at a local high school, park, or fairground and take turns walking or running around a track or path. Each team is asked to have a representative on the track at all times during the event. Because cancer never sleeps, Relays are overnight events up to 24 hours in length.

Relay began in 1985 when Dr. Gordy Klatt, a colorectal surgeon in Tacoma, Washington, ran and walked around a track for 24 hours to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Since then, Relay has grown from a single man’s passion to fight cancer into the world’s largest movement to end the disease. Each year, more than 3.5 million people in 5,000 communities in the United States, along with additional communities in 20 other countries, gather to take part in this global phenomenon and raise much-needed funds and awareness to save lives from cancer. Thanks to Relay participants, the American Cancer Society continues to save lives.

What Happens at Relay For Life events?

Although every Relay For Life is different, there are certain traditions at all Relays, no matter where they are held. These traditions help participants celebrate, remember, and fight back.

Celebrate – The Survivors Lap
Relay starts with a Survivors Lap – a inspirational time when survivors are invited to circle the track together and help everyone celebrate the victories we’ve achieved over cancer. The Survivors Lap is an emotional example of how Relay participants are ensuring that more lives are saved each year – like those of each individual on the track. We also recognize and celebrate caregivers at Relay For Life. These individuals give their time, love, and support to friends, family, neighbors, and coworkers who face cancer. At Relay, people understand the frustrations and joys of being a caregiver, since the effects of cancer reach far beyond just the person diagnosed.

Remember – The Luminaria Ceremony
After dark, we honor people who have been touched by cancer and remember loved ones lost to the disease during the Luminaria Ceremony. Candles are lit inside bags filled with sand, each one bearing the name of a person touched by cancer, and participants often walk a lap in silence. As people take time to remember, those who have walked alongside others battling cancer can grieve and find healing. This is a time that truly highlights the importance of defeating this disease.

Fight Back – The Fight Back Ceremony
Last, there is a Fight Back Ceremony, where we make a personal commitment to save lives by taking up the fight against cancer. That personal commitment may be to do something as simple as getting a screening test, quitting smoking, or talking to elected officials about cancer. By taking action, people are personally taking steps to save lives and fight back against a disease that takes too much.

Celebrate, remember, and fight back are themes that link all Relays events together, but you can learn more about national event standards and recommendations and more about how to structure your Relay’s planning committee using a suggested three-tier approach by connecting to the documents below.