AHHerald Search

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ - On Monday November 4, 2019 at 2:32 P.M., Patrolman Travis Sodon was dispatched to East Highland Avenue in the area of Third Avenue after a resident reported she was walking her dog on a leash when two dogs escaped a residence and attacked her dog, according to a release from the Atlantic Highalnds Police Department.

The owner of the loose dogs was identified as Eric Olving, Atlantic Highlands.  Olving was issued summonses for the following:

2 counts of having a Potentially Dangerous Dog: 4:19-23(2)(a)

2 counts of allowing dogs to run at large: Ordinance 97-13-H-1

2 Counts of having unlicensed dogs: Ordinance 97-13-A

The investigation revealed that this was the second time that Olving's dogs attacked the victim's dog. On June 26, 2019, the dogs escaped Olving's property and bit the victim's dog.  The victim also sustained a dog bite while attempting to separate the dogs.

Atlantic Highlands Police posted the following statement on their facebook page:

"The November 4 dog attack is unrelated to the incident in May which occurred at the corner of East Mount Avenue and Second Avenue, where a dog escaped a yard and killed another dog.

The latest attack occurred when two dogs (house pets) escaped from inside a home.

Officers spoke with the dog owner and asked that he please secure his home so that the dogs cannot escape again.

The matter will be heard in the Atlantic Highlands Municipal Court.."

The page also posted general information about dog etiquette:

The Atlantic Highlands Police Department would like to remind dog owners of the following do’s and dont’s of proper etiquette:

If your dog can roam free in its backyard, the yard should be properly secured so that the dog can not escape.

Always leash your dog on walks (it’s the law). Not everyone is comfortable around dogs. Keep your dog close to you and stay alert to others. Your leash should be short enough to prevent your dog from contacting or jumping on a passerby. Retractable leashes do not allow for control of your dog.

Do not allow dog to dog meetings on walks. Some dogs get nervous when meeting other dogs and could lunge or bark at dogs while on a leash to protect itself.

Do not allow your dog to wander up to strangers. Adults and kids can have allergies, be afraid of dogs, or just not be a dog person.

Keep your dog’s off of other peoples yards. Not every one loves your dog.

Scoop your poop. Bring several bags on your walks to be sure that you have enough. If you run out, come back later to clean it up.

Teach your kids to be cautious around other people’s pets. Your children (and your pets) will be better off if you establish rules for encountering strangers early on. When you approach another family on the sidewalk, pull your dog to your side and encourage your children to walk single file. Remind them to keep their hands to themselves until they ask the animals owner if they can pet it or introduce their own pooch.

Chief of Police David Rossbach advised "Residents should not have to worry about being attacked by loose dogs.  It is every dog owner's responsibility to make sure that their animals are leashed or kept securely on their property."

Any person charged with an offense is presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.