RED BANK, NJ – Linda W. Bricker of Rumson was unanimously elected to her fourth term as president of the Monmouth County Historical Association at the 119th annual meeting of the group held Tuesday evening at the Two River Theater.

At the same meeting, it was announced that Charles H. Jones, III, Ed. D, who has been serving as interim director of the Association for the past six months, will continue in that position through 2018. Jones, has been a trustee of the Association for many years, stepped into the position last year, replacing former director Dr Evelyn Murphy.

Other officers also unanimously elected include first and second vice presidents Ross Milhiser and Sandy Mulhern, Lisa Wilson, replacing Mark Aikins, who stepped down as treasurer, secretary Amy Almasy and assistant treasurer George Dittmar III. 

Seven new trustees were also welcomed by association members, including Christianna Harvey, Pamela Lacey, Michael McCarty, Thomas McManus, Sara Poponak, Lauren Porter and Jesse Spector.

In accepting the officer for another term, Bricker expressed thanks to employees, volunteers and supporters of the Association who all contributed to the success of the association’s ongoing efforts during 2017 to protect, conserve and interpret Monmouth County history and culture, and to make its resources available to the widest group of interested residents and historians. She looked to 2018 as being even more successful in meeting the goals of the association and encompassing increasing numbers of supporters and visitors. Bricker noted the annual |Red, a Valentine’s Day Luncheon which has been a popular event for the pasts ten years, will be held Feb. 1 at 11 a.m. at the Rumson Country Club. The luncheon also includes an opportunity to visit boutique vendors and participate in an auction of both unique and popular gift ideas. Reservations are available by calling Lisa Maher at the Museum at 732-462-1466.

Jones also highlighted significant achievements of the Association during the past year, noting the association’s two residents in Middletown’s historic area have become more popular for visitors and tell a vivid story of the entire history of Middletown and the specific historic district in which they are located. Marlpit Hall and the Taylor-Butler House are two of the five historical houses owned by the association with ties to earlier eras, Taylor Butler to the Civil War era when it was built by descendants of the Taylors of Middletown on inherited family farmland where Marlpit Hall is located. The Taylor-Butler house is available for rental for private occasions, and Jones noted it has hosted everything from weddings and baby showers to a setting for a solemn memorial service.

Following the business meeting, local historian and author Rich Geffkin presented a program on lost Amusement Parks of the Jersey Shore, highlighting three areas of the Bayshore, including the Sandlass-owned Highlands Beach park at what is now the entrance to Gateway National Recreation Area at |Sandy Hook, the Atlantic Highlands Bayview Park on the waterfront in Atlantic Highlands in what is now a residential section and the Red Clay Hill area where the traveling 101 Ranch Wild West show was presented and featured such performers at Tom Mix at the beginning of the 20th century. Geffkin also displayed photos and gave history of the former merry-g-round on Bay Avenue in Highlands, and gave a brief history and pictorial review of the Mandalay, the passenger steamship that brought thousands to visit the shore attractions.

Geffkin is the author, with George Severini, of Lost Amusement Parks of New Jersey which details and offers pictorial histories of each of the parks he highlighted at the meeting, together with others that made history in an earlier Monmouth County resort area.