No Hepatitis B & C by 2030

NEWARD, NJ – Eliminating hepatitis around the world is closer than we may think. Last year’s World Health Assembly adopted The World Health Organization’s (WHO) strategy to eliminate the viruses in the next 13 years (2030). With increased awareness, testing and treatment, hepatitis is a problem we can solve in our lifetime!

Viral hepatitis does not seem to make the headlines the way HIV and other diseases do even though it kills more people around the world than HIV and other diseases combined. It’s a real threat – a global health crisis that affects all, not just one country or one group of people. Most who are infected have no idea that they have hepatitis. If left untreated, it can have devastating health consequences (liver damage, failure or cancer) and death.

There is no better time than now to join the No global movement. On World Hepatitis Day (WHD), we have the power to influence change. Let’s get communities talking about eliminating hepatitis through vaccines, testing and treatment. 

Fast Facts about viral hepatitis:
·       Most common types are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. They are different from one another.
·       Populations most at risk for Hepatitis B are Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities.[1]
·       Baby boomers, those born between the years of 1945 and 1965, are at high risk of Hepatitis C infection.[2] 
·       Most people are not aware of their status - 90% of people living with hepatitis B and 80% living with hepatitis C. [3]
·       Vaccine and treatment are available for Hepatitis B. There is a cure for    Hepatitis C, but no vaccine.
·       A simple blood test is all you need to know if you are infected.

KNOW YOUR STATUS – GET TESTED

Early detection and treatment can make all the difference in living a long, healthy life. Those that are not infected should speak to their healthcare professional about being vaccinated to prevent getting the virus in the future.

For more information, questions, or concerns about hepatitis, as well as, HIV and other STIs (sexually transmitted infections), contact us either by phone at 1-800-624-2377, text/email at 8006242377@njpies.org, or chat www.njhivstdline.org. Calls are free and confidential. Help is always available. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven (7) days a week, every day of the year.

  • Referrals for testing sites and other related services
  • HIV, STD and hepatitis prevention and treatment information  
  • Counseling and treatment locations
  • Partner notification
  • ADDP