strauss mansion by shiroPHOTO: Strauss Mansion and Museum, Atlantic Highlands.  Credit: Riley Shiro.

FREEHOLD - Five historical societies within northern Monmouth County are among the 13 in Monmouth County who shared in a total of more than $50,000 in grants from the Monmouth County Historical Commission presented recently in a ceremony at the Hall of Records.

Freeholder Lillian Burry made the presentations and praised the efforts of all those involved in continuing preservation of local history and the structures important to the memory of events and activities through the centuries in Monmouth County.

Atlantic Highlands Historical Society board member Joanne Dellosso accepted the $6,000 peak restoration award for the ADOLPH Strauss House, a summer cottage built in 1893 which also once served as a 21-room b boarding house until purchased by the Society in 1981 to restore the mansion to its original distinction. The grant enables the society to remove the last vestiges of asbestos shingles and rotted cedar shakes in the third floor peak.

Jennifer Pardeem Bob Sickles and Jim Davis, trustees of the Parker Homestead, accepted the $4356 award which will enable the borough to repaint plaster walls and ceiling, re-open a doorway, expose a beam ceiling and repair a 1720s kitchen fireplace in the farmhouse that remains on land in the original 1664 Monmouth Patent grant.

Mother Debbie Cook, rector of All Saints Memorial Church, and trustees Michael Stasi and Candy Boechel, accepted the $4,800 grant which will enable the church to repair and replace copper gutters and leaders on  both the church and rectory. Known as the Old Stone Church, the Navesink building was designed by Richard Upjohn and is an example of English Gothic Revival architecture. The site is on the National Register of Historic Places and is designated a National Historic Landmark.

Linda Bricker, president of the Monmouth County Historical Association, and Dr. Evelyn Murphy, Director of the Association, accepted a $4,500 grand for exterior restorations for Marlpit Hall in Middletown, the 1756 Taylor family home donated to the Association by the late Mrs. J. Amory Haskell in 1935. The grant enables the association to complete interior and exterior repairs to ensure the structure remains watertight as well as to restore the original visual appearance.

Gordon Clark, Building and Grounds Committee clerk for the Shrewsbury Meeting House, accepted the $4,000 grant to be used to complete ongoing restoration of windows and outside doors on the Quaker meeting House which has remained relatively unchanged since it was first built in 1816. Roots of the Society of Friends in Shrewsbury date back to 1668, predating the better known Philadelphia Society of Friends. 

Other structures receiving grants are in Allentown, Howell, Matawan, Millstone, Neptune, Ocean, Upper Freehold and Wall Township.