ahac painting marko coomerSENSATIONS: Paintings by Marko Coomer  

Opening Reception: Saturday August 5, 6:00-8:00pm

These exhibits will be on display August 1 – September 4 at Atlantic Highlands Arts Council, 54 First Avenue, Atlantic Highlands, NJ 07716.

 

Gallery Hours:Monday – ClosedTuesday –1:00-7:00Wednesday – 1:00-7:00Thursday – 1:00-4:00Friday – 1:00-7:00Saturday – 10:00-7:00Sunday – 11:00-3:00

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ Brooklyn-based artist Marko Coomer draws inspiration from an eclectic mix: 70’s psychedelic posters, Aboriginal art, Indian sand mandalas, nature, music, pop culture, and color.

Marko started drawing and painting at a very early age. He was that artsy kid; the kind that was always working on some kind of creative project. “I’ve always experimented with different kinds of creative media. I live to learn new ways to create, but I always come back to pen on paper or paint on canvas. That’s a constant.”

After graduating from college in Nashville, TN, his work began showing up in art shows, galleries and restaurants throughout Music City in the mid 90’s. His most public work was a 30-foot by 10-foot mural inside one of Nashville’s premiere nightclubs.

Moving to New York City in 2001, he soon began working for Martha Stewart Living, where he thrived for 10 years and eventually served as the Director of Creative Services and Producer for Martha’s television division. Marko says, “Working with some the best creative professionals in the business was an amazing experience for someone like me.”

Currently, Marko is painting with a new enthusiasm, and says, “I’m creating what I like with no rules. In order to put the amount of detail I put into my work, I have to love it.” He has sold paintings to Fortune 500 CEOs, celebrities, designers, truck drivers, and even a burlesque dancer. “I think I appeal to a broad spectrum of people. I hope my art elicits a smile, a bit of fun. It’s a nightclub for your eyes.”

ahac sculpture michelle knoxRELIQUARY LANDSCAPES: A Glass Sculpture Installation by Michelle Knox

Michelle Knox is originally a New Jersey native. She relocated to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1997 where she attended and graduated from The California College of the Arts in 2000 with a Bachelors of Fine Art: emphasizes in Glass. Michelle currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

For more than 15 years, Michelle has study art and specifically glass making at internationally recognized glass institutes such as Public Glass, Urban Glass, Bullseye Glass, Penland School of Crafts and Pilchuck Glass School.

Ms. Knox has studied under many respected artists like Clifford Rainey, Pamina Traylor, Therman Statom, Deb Cerzedsco, Silvia Levenson and most recently Gene Koss at Tulane University where she received her MFA on full scholarship in 2011.

Some recent venues for her work have included the Oakland Museum, The Museum of Craft and Design and the National Liberty Museum, along with numerous other fine art galleries.Trained as a glass blower, Michelle's skills are not limited; she is well versed in glass casting, kiln forming, cold working, metal fabrication and woodworking.

I am interested in creating sculptures and installations that consider their relationship to, about, and from the individual or the space they inhabit. To do this I employ a variety of abstracted visual cues that allude to the figure, the monumental, or the spiritual. The work I create is theatrical in nature and requires participation. This interface comes from simply navigating the space and extends itself to seeing oneself reflected on the often highly reflective surfaces.
These sculptures are created part-by-part and composed with a minimalist logic. I work in a diverse set of media that speaks to the history of sculpture: wood, concrete, and metal as well as glass. These materials are combined with traditional and non-traditional means. Scale and physicality are important aspects to my work. They speak both to the process of making, the literal physical interaction with large masses of material, as well as afford me the ability to speak to architecture – the scale larger than oneself.