Exemplary Ensemble in 110 in the Shade Production Promises Musical Fireworks 

NAVESINK, NJ - The Stone Church Players are hot (!) and now in rehearsals for their not-to-be-missed extraordinary production, 110 in the Shade, a musical adaptation of The Rainmaker.  Originally produced for Broadway by David Merrick during the 1963-64 season, this musical gem was written by N. Richard Nash with music by Harvey Schmidt and lyrics by Tom Jones.  It was also adapted for the big screen starring Katherine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster.  The production at All Saints' will run for two weekends in June,  with evening performances at 8 pm on June 15, 16, 22, and 23, and a matinee performance at 3 pm on Sunday, June 17th.

110 in the Shade tells of the townsfolk in a small Western town parched by a long-standing drought and hot-spell,  and the promise brought  by a stranger who comes insisting he can create the much-needed rain--for a price.  The townsfolk line up on sides for and against the stranger adding to the backdrop of a love triangle he also causes.  The music created for this show is exceptional, and the show is rarely performed by community theatre groups, which speaks to the high caliber talents of The Stone Church Players.

This show is not to be missed!  Reservations for 110 in the Shade can be made by calling the All Saints' Office at 732-291-0214, or by emailing at www.allsaintsnavesink.org.  Alternately, you may stop by the All Saints' Church Office in the Parish House on Fridays, June 8 and 15 from 1 pm-3pm, or on Saturdays, June 9 and 16th, or Sundays June 10th and 17th, from 10:30 am-12:30 pm. to make your reservations.

All Saints’ Memorial Church is an example of English Gothic Revival architecture in America.  Its architect, Richard Upjohn, was a leading exponent of this architectural style and also the designer of Trinity Church, located on Wall Street in New York City.  The cornerstone for All Saints’ was laid on October 7, 1863, and the church was consecrated in 1864. A parish house was built in 1865-6, a rectory in 1869-1870, and carriage sheds at the turn of the century.  The church was officially made a National Historic Site in 1974, and designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1988.