AccuWeather.com reports following a season with the fewest number of hurricanes since 1982, the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season is expected to follow suit as a below-normal hurricane season.'

With roughly 10 named tropical storms, five hurricanes and two major hurricanes predicted for the Atlantic Basin this season, AccuWeather.com's long-range forecasting team anticipates two storms, either tropical storms or hurricanes, to make landfall in the United States.

Atlantic Hurricane Season Key Points:

1. AccuWeather.com is predicting a below-normal hurricane season.

2. Tropical development this season may be altered by the onset of El Niño in late summer or fall.

3. Areas from the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico up through the East Coast will be most vulnerable for impacts from a tropical system.

The onset of El Niño, a short-term phenomenon associated with above-normal water temperatures in the equatorial Pacific, may alter weather patterns across the globe. At some point this summer, El Niño will likely increase wind shear across portions of the Atlantic basin and thus suppress the development of tropical storms this season.

"If we have a robust El Niño develop, then the numbers will be much lower and this could be one of the least active years in recent memory," AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Dan Kottlowski said.

If the 2014 season falls short of normal, it would only be the fourth below-normal season in 20 years, according to NOAA.

The official start of hurricane season, June 1, 2014, could be ushered in by one or two storms in June or July, according to Kottlowski.

However, most storms and the best potential for landfall will be on the horizon for the basin during the heart of hurricane season, which occurs later in the summer and into fall, in the months of August, September and October.