mc bcc radio proclamation

PHOTO:  Tom Brennan, general radio manager at Brookdale Community College, accepted a proclamation from the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders applauding local radio efforts before, during and after Superstorm Sandy, on behalf of “Brookdale Public Radio, 90.5 The Night.” Pictured left to right: Freeholder Gary J. Rich, Sr., Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Tom Brennan, Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso and Freeholder John P. Curley.

Relayed urgent information as the sole means of communication for many

FREEHOLD, NJ –Local radio stations were recognized for their role in providing news and information to the public before, during and after Superstorm Sandy by the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders at their Oct. 24 meeting.

“As the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy approaches, the Board of Chosen Freeholders commends and thanks the local radio stations who disseminated timely and accurate information to all of its listeners,” said Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone. “The entire County appreciates the importance of radio stations and our residents are grateful for their outstanding efforts.”

Tom Brennan, general radio manager at Brookdale Community College, accepted a proclamation on behalf of “Brookdale Public Radio, 90.5 The Night.”

Before, during and after Superstorm Sandy, radio was the only news outlet available for hundreds of thousands of residents who lost power had no access to television, Internet and in some circumstances telephone.

“During that difficult time, Monmouth County residents relied on local radio stations to relay the news that was happening in local communities,” said Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso. “Be it a question of curfews, local shelters, business closures, road and traffic situations or safety precautions, Monmouth County residents were able to tune to their local radio stations for guidance and information.”

In the days leading up to Superstorm Sandy and for weeks afterward, the County’s Department of Public Information worked closely with the County Sheriff’s Office of Emergency Management to provide the most up to date information for residents.

“Radio broadcasting was a critical piece of the County’s communications during and after Sandy,” Sheriff Shaun Golden said. “Through our many press briefings, press releases and phone interviews, our local radio stations really helped us disseminate the most important messages to our residents.” 

Radio broadcasting began in the beginning of the 20th century, and since then has proven to be an essential means for communicating information to the public especially in times of war, terrorism, tragedy and natural disasters.