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AHH 24-Hr. News

IMAGE Assistance Available for Organic Certification Costs
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
TRENTON, NJ  – The New Jersey Department of Agriculture announced a partnership with the federal government to reduce organic certification... Read More...
Owner and Employee of Illegal Online Gambling Website Admit Conspiring wth Genovese Organized Crime Family
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
NEWARK, NJ—Two Union County, New Jersey, men, including the owner of an illegal online sports betting website, today admitted to conspiring with... Read More...
Help Crave Frozen Yogurt Fight Hunger at Their Fundraiser & Food Drive
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
Join the fight against hunger in your community. Old Bridge, NJ – Everyone thinks about hunger during the holiday season, but few people realize... Read More...
Atlantic Highlands Historical Society to Host Outdoor Flea Market
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
Sat.  Sept. 13 ATANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ - The Atlantic Highlands Historical Society will hold its 37th annual Outdoor Flea Market at the Atlantic... Read More...
Highlands Gets Jazzed - Friday, August 8
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
Highlands, NJ - Highlands Borough Arts Council (HBAC) and Waterwitch Coffee & Tea Company are thrilled to invite you to an evening of JAZZ on... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Not the Kind of Anchovy You Put on Pizza
by Joe Reynolds
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
If someone were to ask you the question what’s the most abundant and frequently found fish in Lower New York Bay, including Raritan Bay and Sandy... Read More...
IMAGE Review - Lucy
by David Prown
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
I saw the new movie, "Lucy" the other day starring Scarlett Johansson and Morgan Freeman and this movie is going to do well in the box office. Not... Read More...
IMAGE Adoption Involving Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 26 July 2014
Laura Bloch adored his picture. “My husband and I had just been approved through an adoption agency and the agency sent out a letter with a picture... Read More...
IMAGE Is It The Shadow?
by Woody Zimmerman
Friday, 25 July 2014
“Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of man? (Hoo-hoo-hoo-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!) The Shadow...” Starting in the 1930s, and extending well into... Read More...
IMAGE Spectator’s Observations
by George Hancock-Stefan
Thursday, 24 July 2014
During the World Cup, I watched as many games as possible. I watched them here at home, I watched a couple of games in Turkey where they were... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Wed Jul 30 @ 3:00PM - 04:30PM
Free Summer Mini-Camp
Mon Aug 04 @ 8:00PM -
Middletown Township Committee Workshop Meeting
Tue Aug 05 @ 3:00PM - 04:30PM
Free Summer Mini-Camp
Wed Aug 06 @ 3:00PM - 04:30PM
Free Summer Mini-Camp
Thu Aug 07 @ 7:00PM - 09:00PM
Prostate Cancer Network- US TOO meets

NEW YORK - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hopper Dredge Currituck based in Wilmington, N.C., has begun maintenance dredging work in the Shrewsbury River federal navigation channel to remove critical shoals in the Shrewsbury entrance channel and in the vicinity of Oceanic Bridge on the Navesink River.

The dredge will remove approximately 34,000 cubic yards of sand from the federal navigation channel. The sand will be placed along the Atlantic coast of Sandy Hook, N.J., in the nearshore in approximately 12-15 feet of water. Removal of the most critical shoals will restore a degree of navigational safety to the SeaStreak ferry service and many regional boaters and fishermen.

Dredge Currituck performed the last maintenance dredging in the channel in fall 2010, removing 28,000 cubic yards of material. This cycle of maintenance dredging is scheduled to be completed by the end of the year.

Dredge Currituck is assigned to the Corps' Wilmington District in North Carolina. The self-propelled split-hull hopper dredge is usually in high demand, travelling up and down the eastern United States performing dredging operations at, in addition to Shrewsbury River, places like Shark River and Barnegat Inlet in New Jersey and at various coastal inlets along the Virginia coast. It has a hopper bin capacity of approximately 300 cubic yards. The vessel uses vacuum arms and drag heads on each side of the dredge that, once lowered onto the sediment surface, suction fill into the dredge's hopper bin. The vessel then moves to where the sand is to be deposited and opens its hull like a clamshell, allowing the sand to fall into place.