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AHH 24-Hr. News

IMAGE Nell Irvin Painter to Speak at Brookdale Dec. 4
Tuesday, 25 November 2014
Nell Irvin Painter will speak at Brookdale Community College on Dec. 4 as part of the 2014-15 Visiting Artist Series.    Photo By Robbin Holland LINCROFT, NJ – Renowned historian and artist Nell Irvin Painter will give a free public... Read More...
IMAGE 29 Women Successfully Completed Shore Results’ Jeans Challenge and Lost 2 Jeans Sizes in 8 Weeks
Tuesday, 25 November 2014
Atlantic Highlands, NJ – The Jeans Challenge competition, which was held by Shore Results fitness training studio, and is tailored for women, challenged participants to lose two jeans sizes in eight weeks. All twenty-nine women participating in... Read More...
IMAGE East Coast Storm to Snarl Thanksgiving 2014 Travel
Tuesday, 25 November 2014
AccuWeather reports a storm with rain and heavy snow will cause major disruptions and delays for Thanksgiving travel on the East Coast and in the Appalachians. Rain will initially spread northward along the Interstate-95 with snow and rain to... Read More...
Give Thanks for Designated Drivers
Tuesday, 25 November 2014
Auto Club Advises to have a Plan before heading on Thanksgiving Eve Hamilton, NJ — Thanksgiving Eve or Black Wednesday, as it has come to be known, is the most popular drinking night of the year for college students and young professionals... Read More...
TV Show to Film at Bahrs Landing
Tuesday, 25 November 2014
Public Invited to be a Part of the Studio Audience Highlands, NJ - Highlands Borough Arts Council (HBAC) and Bahrs Landing Restaurant are pleased to launch FilmNITE on the first Fridayof December (12/5).   FilmNITE is an... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Review - Theory of Everything
by David Prown
Tuesday, 25 November 2014
I'm not a science guy.  I have no true understanding of the genius of uber-astrophysicist Stephen Hawking. But the reviews looked... Read More...
IMAGE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Often Not Believed
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 22 November 2014
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), also called Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome, had Carl Miller of Georgetown, Ohio, and his doctors,... Read More...
IMAGE Imparted Concepts
by George Hancock-Stefan
Friday, 21 November 2014
I heard on the news that a baseball player, Giancarlo Stanton, received the highest salary that has ever been paid ($325 million over 13... Read More...
IMAGE Review - Interstellar
by David Prown
Friday, 21 November 2014
I was definitely not jonesing to see "Interstellar" as I'm not really a big special effects guy however I've always liked space movies. My son saw it... Read More...
IMAGE Take It From Snoopy
by Anne Mikolay
Thursday, 20 November 2014
Recently, I cleaned out a trunk full of ancient artifacts from my high school days and came across a little book titled “Happiness is a warm... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Wed Nov 26 @ 9:30AM - 10:00AM
Baby Story Time Ages 10 – 24 months
Wed Nov 26 @10:30AM - 10:50AM
Toddler Story Time Ages 2 & 3
Thu Nov 27 @ 9:00AM - 11:00AM
Middletown Mayor Open Office Hours
Thu Nov 27 @ 3:15PM - 03:45PM
School Age Programs Grades K and up
Thu Nov 27 @ 4:00PM - 04:30PM
Preschool Story Time Ages 3 – 5

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Spring ahead, fall back. Daylight saving time begins Sunday, March 10, which means clocks are turned ahead one hour to gain an extra hour of daylight at the end of each day.

The new time begins officially at 2 a.m. on March 10, but most people turn their clocks ahead an hour when they go to bed the night before.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory Astronomical Applications Department, DST came about in 1918, but was repealed in 1919 in favor of local rules on whether to observe the twice-annual time change. Daylight saving time was re-established and nationally observed at the start of World War II and remained in effect through September 1945.

The Uniformed Time Act of 1966 standardized the observation dates, providing an allowance for local exemptions.

During what the U.S. Naval Observatory called the "energy crisis years" in the 1970s, Congress enacted an early starting date, calling for daylight saving time to begin on Jan. 6 in 1974 and Feb. 23 in 1975. The following year, daylight saving time went back to a late-April start date. Beginning in 1986 and continuing through 2006, the start and end dates of daylight saving time remained consistent. Now those dates have changed, however, thanks to the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

• Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. on the second Sunday of March
• Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday of November

Signed into law on Aug. 8, 2005, the act not only extends daylight saving time by four weeks, but also requires efficiency standards for certain large appliances as well as provisions for energy production, distribution, storage, efficiency, conservation and research.

“Change your clock, change your battery”

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is urging consumers to replace the batteries in their smoke and carbon monoxide alarms this weekend for daylight saving time. Fresh batteries allow smoke and CO alarms to do their jobs saving lives by alerting families of a fire or a buildup of deadly carbon monoxide in their homes.

CPSC estimates there was a yearly average of 386,300 residential fires resulting in nearly 2,400 deaths between 2006 and 2008.

Two-thirds of fire deaths occur in homes where there are no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. That is why it is important to replace batteries at least once every year and to test alarms every month to make sure they work. CPSC recommends consumers have smoke alarms on every level of their home, outside bedrooms and inside each bedroom.

CPSC estimates there was an annual average of 183 unintentional non-fire CO poisoning deaths associated with consumer products between 2006 and 2008. CO is called the "invisible killer" because it is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas. Because of this, people may not know they are being poisoned. Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete burning of fuel in various products, including furnaces, portable generators, fireplaces, cars and charcoal grills.