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AHH 24-Hr. News

Monmouth University Volunteers Seeking Worksites for The Big Event
Monday, 29 September 2014
West Long Branch, N.J. - Monmouth University’s Student Government Association is looking for worksites for The Big Event. Now in its 15th year, the... Read More...
IMAGE County Reminds Drivers that Kozloski Road Speed Limit is 50mph
Monday, 29 September 2014
FREEHOLD, NJ – Today, MonmouthCounty traffic safety crews placed four variable message boards along Kozloski Road (CR 55) between the State Highway... Read More...
IMAGE Iselin Man Shot Once in the Abdomen after Grabbing for Officer’s Weapon
Monday, 29 September 2014
FREEHOLD, NJ - An Asbury Park police officer was injured during an altercation with a knife-wielding Middlesex County man who was shot by a... Read More...
IMAGE County Provides VA Access to Veteran Inmates Through Videoconferencing
Monday, 29 September 2014
FREEHOLD, NJ - Sheriff Shaun Golden is leading the way when it comes to assisting veterans upon release from the Monmouth County Correctional... Read More...
IMAGE Poetry Reading by Saliba Sarsar at Monmouth University on October 6
Monday, 29 September 2014
West Long Branch, N.J. - Political Science Professor and author Saliba Sarsar will give a poetry reading on October 6, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., in the... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE What’s Living in Raritan-Sandy Hook Bays?
by Joe Reynolds
Sunday, 28 September 2014
On Sunday, September 28, volunteers with the Bayshore Regional Watershed Council, an all-volunteer environmental group dedicated to restoring Raritan... Read More...
IMAGE Wakefield Gets SA Chapters Running
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 27 September 2014
My featured person this week, Margery Wakefield, of Lansing, Michigan, has had lifelong struggles with schizophrenia, a mental health disability. For... Read More...
IMAGE Life in the Tidelines near NY Harbor
by Joe Reynolds
Thursday, 25 September 2014
There’s a nor’easter heading our way, but the other day it was sunny, calm, and lovely out. Trying to take advantage of the pleasant weather... Read More...
IMAGE Climate-change Campaign’s Dark Side
by Woody Zimmerman
Wednesday, 24 September 2014
Global Warming is a “new kind of morality,” said British Channel 4’s 2007 documentary, “The Great Global Warming Swindle.” The dark side of... Read More...
IMAGE Steinbach Tackles Paranoid Schizophrenia
by Daniel J. Vance
Sunday, 21 September 2014
He began hearing voices in his head at age 15. Said Charles Steinbach, of Grand Junction, Colorado, in a telephone interview: “It started with... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Tue Sep 30 @ 7:00AM -
Business Roundtable - MC Freeholders
Wed Oct 01 @ 9:30AM - 10:00AM
Baby Story Time Ages 10 – 24 months
Wed Oct 01 @10:30AM - 10:50AM
Toddler Story Time Ages 2 & 3
Thu Oct 02 @ 3:15PM - 03:45PM
School Age Programs Grades K and up
Thu Oct 02 @ 4:00PM - 04:30PM
Preschool Story Time Ages 3 – 5

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Spring ahead, fall back. Daylight saving time begins Sunday, March 10, which means clocks are turned ahead one hour to gain an extra hour of daylight at the end of each day.

The new time begins officially at 2 a.m. on March 10, but most people turn their clocks ahead an hour when they go to bed the night before.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory Astronomical Applications Department, DST came about in 1918, but was repealed in 1919 in favor of local rules on whether to observe the twice-annual time change. Daylight saving time was re-established and nationally observed at the start of World War II and remained in effect through September 1945.

The Uniformed Time Act of 1966 standardized the observation dates, providing an allowance for local exemptions.

During what the U.S. Naval Observatory called the "energy crisis years" in the 1970s, Congress enacted an early starting date, calling for daylight saving time to begin on Jan. 6 in 1974 and Feb. 23 in 1975. The following year, daylight saving time went back to a late-April start date. Beginning in 1986 and continuing through 2006, the start and end dates of daylight saving time remained consistent. Now those dates have changed, however, thanks to the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

• Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. on the second Sunday of March
• Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday of November

Signed into law on Aug. 8, 2005, the act not only extends daylight saving time by four weeks, but also requires efficiency standards for certain large appliances as well as provisions for energy production, distribution, storage, efficiency, conservation and research.

“Change your clock, change your battery”

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is urging consumers to replace the batteries in their smoke and carbon monoxide alarms this weekend for daylight saving time. Fresh batteries allow smoke and CO alarms to do their jobs saving lives by alerting families of a fire or a buildup of deadly carbon monoxide in their homes.

CPSC estimates there was a yearly average of 386,300 residential fires resulting in nearly 2,400 deaths between 2006 and 2008.

Two-thirds of fire deaths occur in homes where there are no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. That is why it is important to replace batteries at least once every year and to test alarms every month to make sure they work. CPSC recommends consumers have smoke alarms on every level of their home, outside bedrooms and inside each bedroom.

CPSC estimates there was an annual average of 183 unintentional non-fire CO poisoning deaths associated with consumer products between 2006 and 2008. CO is called the "invisible killer" because it is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas. Because of this, people may not know they are being poisoned. Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete burning of fuel in various products, including furnaces, portable generators, fireplaces, cars and charcoal grills.