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AHH 24-Hr. News

Mid-day Paving of Hubbard Avenue Tuesday
Monday, 24 November 2014
Motorist should expect detours from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MIDDLETOWN, NJ – From 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 25, Hubbard Avenue will be closed for a repaving project.   Motorists should expect travel delays in the area while this work... Read More...
Atlantic Highlands Chamber of Commerce Sponsors “Shop Downtown”
Monday, 24 November 2014
Atlantic Highlands, NJ - The Atlantic Highlands Chamber of Commerce is encouraging the community to visit “Downtown Atlantic Highlands” this holiday season! There is something for everyone on your list whether they have been naughty or nice.... Read More...
Free Holiday Movie with Non-Perishable Food Donation
Monday, 24 November 2014
Atlantic Highlands, NJ - The Atlantic Highlands Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a free Holiday movie for the second year on December 6th at 10:00 AM at Atlantic Cinemas, 82 First Avenue, AtlanticHighlands.  The movie will be “Polar... Read More...
Dog Alerts Owners to House Fire
Monday, 24 November 2014
MIDDLETOWN, NJ - At 2:39 AM on Monday November 24th, 2014, the Middletown Township Fire Department was dispatched to a “reported structure fire at 10 The Vista Road” in the Old Village section of the Township. Approximately 40 firefighters from... Read More...
Christmas Concert at St. Agnes Catholic Church, Dec. 14
Monday, 24 November 2014
ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS -- St. Agnes Catholic Church will stage it annual Christmas concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 14.        The concert marks the 20th year that G. Thomas Elliott has directed the performance by the... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Often Not Believed
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 22 November 2014
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), also called Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome, had Carl Miller of Georgetown, Ohio, and his doctors,... Read More...
IMAGE Imparted Concepts
by George Hancock-Stefan
Friday, 21 November 2014
I heard on the news that a baseball player, Giancarlo Stanton, received the highest salary that has ever been paid ($325 million over 13... Read More...
IMAGE Review - Interstellar
by David Prown
Friday, 21 November 2014
I was definitely not jonesing to see "Interstellar" as I'm not really a big special effects guy however I've always liked space movies. My son saw it... Read More...
IMAGE Take It From Snoopy
by Anne Mikolay
Thursday, 20 November 2014
Recently, I cleaned out a trunk full of ancient artifacts from my high school days and came across a little book titled “Happiness is a warm... Read More...
IMAGE Happy Birthday to a Group Very Special to Atlantic Highlands
by Jack Archibald
Thursday, 20 November 2014
This column typically avoids mentioning birthdays, as each of us is special and our birthday is something to be celebrated.  But a recent... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Mon Nov 24 @11:00AM - 01:00PM
Diabetes Awareness Day
Wed Nov 26 @ 9:30AM - 10:00AM
Baby Story Time Ages 10 – 24 months
Wed Nov 26 @10:30AM - 10:50AM
Toddler Story Time Ages 2 & 3
Thu Nov 27 @ 9:00AM - 11:00AM
Middletown Mayor Open Office Hours
Thu Nov 27 @ 3:15PM - 03:45PM
School Age Programs Grades K and up

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Spring ahead, fall back. Daylight saving time begins Sunday, March 10, which means clocks are turned ahead one hour to gain an extra hour of daylight at the end of each day.

The new time begins officially at 2 a.m. on March 10, but most people turn their clocks ahead an hour when they go to bed the night before.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory Astronomical Applications Department, DST came about in 1918, but was repealed in 1919 in favor of local rules on whether to observe the twice-annual time change. Daylight saving time was re-established and nationally observed at the start of World War II and remained in effect through September 1945.

The Uniformed Time Act of 1966 standardized the observation dates, providing an allowance for local exemptions.

During what the U.S. Naval Observatory called the "energy crisis years" in the 1970s, Congress enacted an early starting date, calling for daylight saving time to begin on Jan. 6 in 1974 and Feb. 23 in 1975. The following year, daylight saving time went back to a late-April start date. Beginning in 1986 and continuing through 2006, the start and end dates of daylight saving time remained consistent. Now those dates have changed, however, thanks to the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

• Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. on the second Sunday of March
• Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday of November

Signed into law on Aug. 8, 2005, the act not only extends daylight saving time by four weeks, but also requires efficiency standards for certain large appliances as well as provisions for energy production, distribution, storage, efficiency, conservation and research.

“Change your clock, change your battery”

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is urging consumers to replace the batteries in their smoke and carbon monoxide alarms this weekend for daylight saving time. Fresh batteries allow smoke and CO alarms to do their jobs saving lives by alerting families of a fire or a buildup of deadly carbon monoxide in their homes.

CPSC estimates there was a yearly average of 386,300 residential fires resulting in nearly 2,400 deaths between 2006 and 2008.

Two-thirds of fire deaths occur in homes where there are no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. That is why it is important to replace batteries at least once every year and to test alarms every month to make sure they work. CPSC recommends consumers have smoke alarms on every level of their home, outside bedrooms and inside each bedroom.

CPSC estimates there was an annual average of 183 unintentional non-fire CO poisoning deaths associated with consumer products between 2006 and 2008. CO is called the "invisible killer" because it is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas. Because of this, people may not know they are being poisoned. Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete burning of fuel in various products, including furnaces, portable generators, fireplaces, cars and charcoal grills.