This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(732) 872-1957

AHH 24-Hr. News

IMAGE First Annual Keyport Antique and Artisan Festival
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
Keyport, NJ - From painting on the waterfront to perusing fine antiques on West Front Street, Keyport’s First Annual Keyport Antique and Artisan Festival takes place on May 16, 2015. From 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., artisans and antique dealers will fill... Read More...
Swatting Hoax in Keyport
Monday, 20 April 2015
KEYPORT, NJ - An anonymous caller to Keyport Police at 1:37 p.m. Sunday afternoon stated that he had stabbed a female and was holding another person hostage at a residence.  The male caller said he would kill the hostages and any responding... Read More...
IMAGE Former Mayor Helen Marchetti Celebrates Her 90th With Flair
Monday, 20 April 2015
PHOTO: Helen Marchetti celebrates with friends at her 90th birthday party.  Photo courtesy Tracey Abby-White. ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ -  In her typical fashion and with her usual flair, former Mayor Helen Marchetti threw a party for herself... Read More...
Care One Care Center Honors Volunteers
Monday, 20 April 2015
Care One Center honors volunteers MIDDLETOWN, NJ – More than 50 volunteers and organizations were honored at the annual Volunteer Reception at the Care One Care Center on Route 36 at a gala wine and hors d’oeuvres reception in the Center Dining... Read More...
IMAGE Bayshore Pharmacy Among Top Three National Finalists
Monday, 20 April 2015
ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ - Bayshore Pharmacy, the family owned business in the Foodtown Shopping Center on Route 36, is one of three top finalists in the country to be selected as the Pharmacy of the Year. The nomination and selection are made by the... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Fish Hawks Make a Home in NY Harbor
by Joe Reynolds
Monday, 20 April 2015
Come April, all life begins to stir, speed, shuffle, and move. It’s a time of resurrections and returns.  There is an urgent need for many... Read More...
IMAGE Review - While We're Young
by David Prown
Saturday, 18 April 2015
So I hadn't been to the movies in several weeks found a time slot and "While We're Young" filled the slot. I was not excited to see this Ben... Read More...
IMAGE Carolinian with Bipolar Disorder Had Success
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 18 April 2015
According to the National Institutes of Health, bipolar disorder (formerly manic-depressive illness) is a “brain disorder causing unusual shifts in... Read More...
IMAGE Return of the Brownshirts
by Woody Zimmerman
Friday, 17 April 2015
In the 1930s, gangs of brown-shirted street thugs smashed Jewish shop-windows, terrorized voters at the polls, and generally raised hell all across... Read More...
IMAGE Skewed View - April 17, 2015
by Tom Brennan
Friday, 17 April 2015
The second thing should do before starting a carjacking business is learn how to drive a stick: http://bit.ly/1H2BdkM What's worse than losing your... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Wed Apr 22 @ 7:00PM -
AH Council Meeting
Thu Apr 23 @ 7:30PM -
Find Edsell!: Book-Signing
Fri Apr 24 @12:00AM
Memorial Tree Planting for Bill Phillips
Sat Apr 25 @10:00AM - 02:00PM
Middletown Collecting Unwanted Medication
Wed Apr 29 @ 7:00PM -
The Bible in Context - 6 wk. Seminar

clock_dst

Spring ahead, fall back. Daylight saving time begins Sunday, March 10, which means clocks are turned ahead one hour to gain an extra hour of daylight at the end of each day.

The new time begins officially at 2 a.m. on March 10, but most people turn their clocks ahead an hour when they go to bed the night before.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory Astronomical Applications Department, DST came about in 1918, but was repealed in 1919 in favor of local rules on whether to observe the twice-annual time change. Daylight saving time was re-established and nationally observed at the start of World War II and remained in effect through September 1945.

The Uniformed Time Act of 1966 standardized the observation dates, providing an allowance for local exemptions.

During what the U.S. Naval Observatory called the "energy crisis years" in the 1970s, Congress enacted an early starting date, calling for daylight saving time to begin on Jan. 6 in 1974 and Feb. 23 in 1975. The following year, daylight saving time went back to a late-April start date. Beginning in 1986 and continuing through 2006, the start and end dates of daylight saving time remained consistent. Now those dates have changed, however, thanks to the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

• Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. on the second Sunday of March
• Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday of November

Signed into law on Aug. 8, 2005, the act not only extends daylight saving time by four weeks, but also requires efficiency standards for certain large appliances as well as provisions for energy production, distribution, storage, efficiency, conservation and research.

“Change your clock, change your battery”

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is urging consumers to replace the batteries in their smoke and carbon monoxide alarms this weekend for daylight saving time. Fresh batteries allow smoke and CO alarms to do their jobs saving lives by alerting families of a fire or a buildup of deadly carbon monoxide in their homes.

CPSC estimates there was a yearly average of 386,300 residential fires resulting in nearly 2,400 deaths between 2006 and 2008.

Two-thirds of fire deaths occur in homes where there are no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. That is why it is important to replace batteries at least once every year and to test alarms every month to make sure they work. CPSC recommends consumers have smoke alarms on every level of their home, outside bedrooms and inside each bedroom.

CPSC estimates there was an annual average of 183 unintentional non-fire CO poisoning deaths associated with consumer products between 2006 and 2008. CO is called the "invisible killer" because it is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas. Because of this, people may not know they are being poisoned. Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete burning of fuel in various products, including furnaces, portable generators, fireplaces, cars and charcoal grills.