Dear Editor,

It is a monumental victory to see that Washington DC has voted to legalize marijuana for everyone, in addition to similar votes in Oregon, Alaska and the City of South Portland (Maine).
 
These jurisdictions proudly join Washington state and Colorado by ending prohibition, and choosing to regulate cannabis like alcohol for adults.

In a less publicized victory, Guam voted to legalize medical marijuana. This is important because Guam, like DC is a under the direct control of the federal government.This negates the federal laws prohibiting marijuana.

It is shameful that Governor Christie and Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini have engaged in obstructionist policies to prevent the successful implementation of medical marijuana in our state. Angelini runs an entire business that depends on the Reefer Madness lies to stay afloat and Christie is too closely linked to the pharmaceutical, rehab and prison industries. In his first term, Christie suspiciously appointed Poonam Alaigh, a former GlaxoSmithKline executive to run the Department of Health and Senior Services, which regulates medical marijuana in NJ. This was a clear conflict of interest.
 
Even seriously-ill Post Traumatic Stress Disorder patients are still targeted for criminal prosecution over marijuana possession in New Jersey, due to Governor Christie. As a PTSD patient, I shouldn't be forced to choose between arrest and following medical advice.

Until the law is changed, I will be forced to keep breaking it by using medical marijuana and providing it to other patients who have been unable to legally access their medicine. It's not a choice, but a medical necessity for all of us.
 
While Christie and Angelini would label me as a drug dealer, a very sick cancer patient who I have helped has called me an angel and compared me to Mother Teresa.
 
While such comparisons are humbling, I believe history will view my actions positively and my lack of funds would prove altriustic motivations in my distribution activities. I will never say no to a sick person in need and should I get sent to jail for it, upon release I would continue right where I left off.
 
I encourage everyone to join me in civil disobedience and break these unjust laws, because medical marijuana patients in New Jersey are out-of-time. We shall overcome and overgrow the Governor with our seeds of change.

At the end of the day, we must all thank marijuana activists Marc Emery for leading the way on legalization globally and Edward "NJ Weedman" Forchion locally in New Jersey. Without their tireless efforts, marijuana might not be legal anywhere.

Eric Hafner
Toms River