The campaign for the Republican nomination is in full swing with no clear frontrunner making a move. Each month there is a new face to have the top spot while the several other candidates jockey for position almost waiting for their turn to be the prime mover of the campaign. Also interesting is the fact that as each new man or woman takes the lead there comes with it the scrutiny of the particular candidate’s peccadillos. Sometimes these charges are bordering on the insignificant; sometimes they are untrue and sometimes quite revealing. Your party affiliation most likely will cause you to dismiss charges against your guy and point out the foibles of the other guy.

These reports whether or not insignificant have an effect of loosening the current poll leader from his or her perch. Herman Cain is the current case in point as his numbers have slipped a bit after the sexual harassment charges have been reported. But each candidate has had his ‘time in the barrel’ during this campaign season with all the players ending up on the disabled list for a stint. Some will come back while others will experience a season ending injury.

This process is good and bad. While it is an excellent method of examining the candidates and allows voters to separate the wheat from the chaff; it discourages many fine Americans from ever getting involved. Americans who may be best qualified to lead this nation but do not wish to rehash a personal problem from decades past. So ‘We the People’ get stuck with career politicians and must make the best of the available selection.

I am hopeful that the group of Republican candidates remains in the campaign and there is no one candidate that takes the lead causing the others to drop out. Four years ago I was not happy with the early selection of John McCain after a few primaries. It also is ridiculous that Iowa and New Hampshire because of their early caucus and primary will pick the nominee for the rest of the country’s Republicans. My hope is that the candidate is not decided until the convention meets in the summer of 2012. In 1960 when the convention had a more prominent role in picking candidates, John F. Kennedy was obliged to take a man he disliked Lyndon B. Johnson onto the ticket to secure votes in the general election. It was a winning play by the Democrats.
                                                                     

Blaise Piazza
Atlantic Highlands