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AHH 24-Hr. News

Financial Peace University Course Offered at Central Baptist
Wednesday, 17 September 2014
ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ - Beginning October 6, 2014, Central Baptist Church will host Financial Peace University. The course is open to all members of... Read More...
IMAGE Bayshore Pharmacy Celebrates Golden Anniversary
Wednesday, 17 September 2014
ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ - Bayshore Pharmacy, Atlantic Highlands’ only pharmacy, is celebrating 50 years of serving the health and wellness needs of... Read More...
Monmouth County Junior League to Hold Forum on Teen Suicide Prevention
Wednesday, 17 September 2014
Rumson, NJ -  On Friday, September 26, the Junior League of Monmouth County (JLMC) will host a forum on Teen Suicide Prevention at 9:30 to 11 am... Read More...
Contemporary Christian Concert in Freehold
Wednesday, 17 September 2014
FREEHOLD, NJ - Join us for an evening of uplifting and inspiring music.  Nancy Scharff and her Praise Band “King of Kings” will present a... Read More...
Meet Local Resident Gedney Webb, Music Supervisor and Editor of the Film The Hundred-Foot Journey
Wednesday, 17 September 2014
Atlantic Highlands, NJ - On September 19, after the 7:15pm screening of The Hundred-Foot Journey  at Atlantic Cinemas, 82 First Ave, Atlantic... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Uncertain Trumpet-Call
by Woody Zimmerman
Tuesday, 16 September 2014
On the idle hill of summer,Sleepy with the flow of streams,Far I hear the steady drummerDrumming like a noise in dreams.Far and near and low and... Read More...
IMAGE Hoy for the Hall of Fame
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 13 September 2014
I guess every year you'll just have to get used to reading about William Elsworth “Dummy” Hoy, a deaf professional baseball player from... Read More...
IMAGE 9/11 - An Historic Shift
by Jack Archibald
Friday, 12 September 2014
Wherever you walk in lower Manhattan on September 11, there is always some quiet reflection going on.  Most of the workers are quietly going... Read More...
IMAGE Skewed View - September 12, 2014
by Tom Brennan
Friday, 12 September 2014
Here's a handy info graph that shows what diseases kills most of us and how much we give to those diseases: http://bit.ly/1lLNoKL "12 Year-old... Read More...
IMAGE Could Someone Else Pray?
by George Hancock-Stefan
Thursday, 11 September 2014
E. M. Bounds starts his book on prayer by telling us that the world will never know the things that were altered through prayer - Elijah praying and... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Wed Sep 17 @ 9:30AM - 11:00AM
Gymboree Play and Music! - AH Library
Wed Sep 17 @ 9:30AM - 10:00AM
Baby Story Time Ages 10 – 24 months
Wed Sep 17 @10:30AM - 10:50AM
Toddler Story Time Ages 2 & 3
Wed Sep 17 @11:00AM -
Making "Segmented" Wooden Bowls
Thu Sep 18 @ 3:15PM - 03:45PM
School Age Programs Grades K and up

joe_reynoldsWith the forecast calling for cloudy skies for most of New Year's Eve, I took another sunrise trudge down along the beach to go bird watching in an attempt to seize good light. My morning effort took me to Sea Bright, a barrier island community in New Jersey with the Atlantic Ocean on one side and the Shrewsbury River on the other, and located just south from the entrance to New York Harbor. Even as the people in this town rebuild after a devastating blow from Super-storm Sandy, there is access to the beach (which is always a good thing) where one can find beauty, affection, and great coastal wildlife watching.

First thought on my mind upon arrival, except for more than a few gulls, it seemed odd that the ocean seemed so empty for a late December day. This may be year's end for humans, but it's only the beginning for winter  wildlife. Conspicuous by their absence were any winter ducks, loons, gannets, sanderlings, even cormorants.

I thought my time here was a complete waste, then there it was. Out of nowhere, about 30 yards from the edge of the beach was a large, heavy built water bird. The bird must have been at least two feet in length.  Yet, it was tricky to get a good look. The bird kept diving in and out of the cold ocean water to catch a meal of either Spider Crabs or Lady Crabs. 

With binoculars in hand, I noticed the bird was dark cinnamon-brown and soft white in color. The bird also had a very unique profile. Its bill was distinctive, long and sloping, dull yellow in color. What was this strange looking bird?

eiderdown_1

Although the bird had the profile and shape of an eider, it didn't have any of its beautiful showy and flashy feathers. Adult male Common Eiders are eye-catching birds with a long bill and bright white and brilliant black downy feathers.

Instead, this bird's feathers were kind of dim to match the overcast day. Whatever it was it was uncommon to the Lower New York Bay environment.  

A quick review of The Crossley ID Guide to Eastern Birds showed the bird to be a juvenile eider, a first-year Common Eider in fact. Wow, that changed everything. What a great sight to see this rarity, and swimming and foraging so close to the active waters of New York Harbor. Although a first year bird, I still felt lucky to have been able to see and photograph this sporadically seen eider.

eiderdown_2

This young eider must have recently flew in from where it hatched over the summer. The "Atlantic Eider" population of Common Eiders, which are seen along the coast of New Jersey and New York in the winter, usually nest on rocky coastlines or on offshore rocks in the tundra along much of the north Canadian mainland, including the coast of Hudson Bay, on Canada's Arctic islands, or along the coast of Greenland or Iceland.  It was almost certainly an over two thousand mile journey for this young eider to reach the Jersey Shore in rain, snow, and strong winds.

The eiders are pushed south come autumn by advancing sea ice. Most will winter near the coast to forage in shallow waters from Labrador south to Virginia. Young birds sometimes venture as far south as Florida.

This immature eider will most likely stay along the coast of Sea Bright for a bit to take a break. Then off it will go, maybe to try to re-group with its family or other eiders somewhere in maritime waters. Eiders are hardy migrants that love rough, cold water. The rougher and colder, the better for these birds. Eiders are the most maritime of all waterfowl. Except when breeding, eiders will spend their entire time on cold northern  waters diving deep to the ocean bottom for food. They will use their lengthy, strong bills to catch mollusks, with a fondness for mussels, or crustaceans, or even an occasional sea urchin.

What keeps the eiders from freezing in cold waters and wintry weather are their soft, fluffy down feathers found beneath their tougher external feathers.  Down feathers are one of the best heat-insulating materials made by Mother Nature. The loose form or structure of down feathers helps to trap body heat in, which helps to insulate the bird against heat loss and also contributes to the bird's buoyancy.

Unfortunately, this "eiderdown" is also highly prized by people to make sleeping bags, blankets, pillows, or any other product used to fill a feather/down item. Common Eiders have suffered greatly because of their downy feathers for more than a century. The population we see during the winter time in New York and New Jersey was nearly wiped out by market hunters. 

eiderdown_3

Although it's a good sign to see a young healthy Common Eider, these large beautiful water birds still face an array of challenges. According to the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna,  a biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, which consists of National Representatives assigned by each of the eight Arctic Council Member States, including the United States, Canada, Russia, and Greenland, many eider populations have declined in recent decades. Some populations are thought to have declined by 50% or more since the early 1970s, and several formerly large colonies in western Greenland may have almost disappeared. Yet, quantitative information is too scarce to estimate an overall decline and trends for the species are difficult to trace, since the birds nest in remote places in the Arctic.

The most notable global threats to eiders include hunting for down collection, especially in areas where there is a longstanding hunting tradition, such as in Labrador and Newfoundland. Mortality in commercial fishing is also a major threat, as are oil contamination and lead contamination, which follows to reproductive failure. Work needs to be done by many countries to minimize adverse effects of commercial activities on eiders and to protect the bird's aquatic and nesting habitats to ensure the continued viability of eider populations.

But why wait for countries to act. Some of the things you can do as an individual to help protect Common Eiders from population decline include: First, reduce or don't buy products with down. Second, write to companies that manufacture down products, like sleeping bags, jackets, blankets, and pillows, to ask them to provide the origins of down feathers on all their products. As of today, many companies  refuse to provide information about the origins of their down and feathers. Why? Perhaps the origin was done by illegal hunting or harvesting.

I will keep my eyes open to see if another Common Eider can be spotted again along the coast of Sea Bright. It would be wonderful, though, if someday this beautiful duck becomes abundant for all to see throughout the winter in the busy waters of New York Harbor and down the Jersey Shore.

For more information, pictures and year-round sightings of wildlife in or near Sandy Hook Bay, please check out my blog entitled, Nature on the Edge of New York City at http://www.natureontheedgenyc.com