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AHH 24-Hr. News

Major Loophole in NJ Microbeads Ban Legislation
Friday, 21 November 2014
5 Gyres, NY/NJ Baykeeper, and Clean Ocean Action support alternative Keyport, N.J. - New Jersey Bill S2178 would phase out plastic microbeads in personal care products such as toothpastes and exfoliating face washes, beginning January... Read More...
Time to Prepare for 2014 Winter Weather
Friday, 21 November 2014
Communication is key during a storm FREEHOLD, NJ – With record breaking snow in New YorkState this week and a forecast of cold weather continuing, we are reminded that we must be prepared for winter weather. “Now is the time for us to prepare... Read More...
Jersey Give-Back Guide Returns to Simplify Year-end Giving to NJ Nonprofits
Friday, 21 November 2014
Monmouth County Arts Council Among Listed Non-Profits MORRISTOWN, N.J. – Year-end giving in New Jersey just got easier with the debut of this year’s Jersey Give Back Guide, an online giving tool designed to showcase and support some of the... Read More...
Keyport-Aberdeen Bridge (MA-14) Project to be Topic of Meetings
Friday, 21 November 2014
Two information sessions scheduled in December KEYPORT, NJ – The public information meeting about the planned replacement of County Bridge MA-14 over Matawan Creek located between Keyport and Aberdeen, is scheduled from 6 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday,... Read More...
IMAGE Roadwork Advisory for Middletown
Friday, 21 November 2014
MIDDLETOWN, NJ -  Middletown Township has issued the following roadwork advisory: All roadwork is subject to immediate change without notice. Call the Traffic Bureau at 732-615-2045 with questions. Newman Springs Road (Route 520) Construction... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Review - Interstellar
by David Prown
Friday, 21 November 2014
I was definitely not jonesing to see "Interstellar" as I'm not really a big special effects guy however I've always liked space movies. My son saw it... Read More...
IMAGE Take It From Snoopy
by Anne Mikolay
Thursday, 20 November 2014
Recently, I cleaned out a trunk full of ancient artifacts from my high school days and came across a little book titled “Happiness is a warm... Read More...
IMAGE Happy Birthday to a Group Very Special to Atlantic Highlands
by Jack Archibald
Thursday, 20 November 2014
This column typically avoids mentioning birthdays, as each of us is special and our birthday is something to be celebrated.  But a recent... Read More...
IMAGE Wigged Out at the White House?
by Woody Zimmerman
Tuesday, 18 November 2014
Has Barack Hussein Obama finally flipped out? One could reasonably conclude that after hearing the president’s remarks following an epic electoral... Read More...
IMAGE Skewed View - November 16, 2014
by Tom Brennan
Sunday, 16 November 2014
I have nothing funny or witty to say about this, "Brookdale Community College floats plan for 210 layoffs" : http://on.app.com/1GVIO49 PSA: If your... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Sat Nov 22 @10:00AM - 12:00AM
Chess Class - AH
Mon Nov 24 @11:00AM - 01:00PM
Diabetes Awareness Day
Wed Nov 26 @ 9:30AM - 10:00AM
Baby Story Time Ages 10 – 24 months
Wed Nov 26 @10:30AM - 10:50AM
Toddler Story Time Ages 2 & 3
Thu Nov 27 @ 9:00AM - 11:00AM
Middletown Mayor Open Office Hours

joe_reynoldsOkay, I will admit that more people welcome the return of the baseball season this time of year than the arrival of the Osprey breeding season, but I am not sure why. You don't need an expensive ticket to view the action at a local Osprey nest and it occurs rain or shine.

Just look for a large nest of sticks constructed at the top of a dead tree or on an artificial nesting platform or other structures, like a cell phone tower or buoy, in or near a large body of water and this will be the best place to watch out the Osprey breeding season from April through September.

Along the shores of Lower New York Bay and within it vast tidal wetlands, over 50 Ospreys, otherwise known as Fish Hawks, have gathered on their breeding grounds to raise a family. The female lays one to four eggs, but usually three.

Soon after St. Patrick's Day, the first Ospreys arrived to our urban tidal waters to ready their nests. These large gawky birds were tired and weary from the long flight back from their tropical wintering locations. While we don't necessarily think of Osprey's has having a long, intense winged migration, they are certainly capable of it. For example, a 2008 study by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology revealed that during 13 days in a fall migration period, an Osprey flew over 2,700 miles from Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, to French Guiana, South America to spend the winter. Ospreys have been known to fly long distances to locate the perfect place to endure.

osprey_nesting

In March and early April around Lower New York Bay, the Ospreys will reunite with their partners, usually at the same nest site they have used year after year. An Osprey's nest can often become quite large (up to 10 feet high) as more branches, sticks, and other nesting material is added before the beginning of each breeding season. Some Ospreys pairs have been together for years, others for life. Ospreys are generally monogamous and birds three years or older usually mate for life.

Now mating Ospreys will busy themselves day and night around the bay for the next 6 to 7 weeks during the incubation period of their fragile cream-colored spotted eggs. The adult birds have turned into parents and will spend time to make sure everything is just right for the hatching of their babies.

osprey_nesting_2

Once hatched, nearly 2-ounce helpless chicks that can barely call for food will need to be taken care of. Incredibly, with a plentiful supply of fish, these tiny balls of feathers will become as tall as their parents in just eight weeks.

The life of a baby Osprey, however, is more complex than this and is not always pleasant. Osprey eggs do not hatch all at once. Rather, the first chick emerges up to five days before the last one. The older hatchling dominates its younger siblings, and can monopolize the food brought by the parents. If food is abundant, chicks share meals in relative harmony; but in times of scarcity, younger ones may starve to death. It is survival of the fittest being played out every year downstream from Lower Manhattan.

Fortunately, the story of Ospreys in Lower New York Bay is one of general splendor and hope. The population is increasing and after decades of being an endangered species due largely to pollution, this Fish hawk is now a common sight around local waters.

osprey_flying

Although the Osprey is still listed as a threatened species in New Jersey and a species of special concern in New York State, if the human residents of the bay continue to take strong measures to restore and preserve our waterways and aquatic habitats, then the Osprey will remain a beautiful symbol of Lower New York Bay and its breeding season will persist as an important seasonal show for generations of people to enjoy. Just don't forget to bring a bag of crackerjacks or peanuts, and maybe some sushi for the Ospreys!

For more information, pictures and year-round sightings of wildlife in or near Sandy Hook Bay, please check out my blog entitled, Nature on the Edge of New York City at http://natureontheedgenyc.blogspot.com/