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AHH 24-Hr. News

IMAGE Wreaths Across America Convoy Coming to New Jersey
Sunday, 23 November 2014
With the help of thousands of volunteers, Wreaths Across America (WAA) is working to fulfill its mission of remembering, honoring and teaching through the annual laying of wreaths at Arlington National Cemetery. The wreaths’ journey to Arlington... Read More...
Former South Plainfield Police Captain Sentenced To 20 Years In Prison For Sexually Exploiting A Minor
Sunday, 23 November 2014
TRENTON, N.J. – A former South Plainfield police captain was sentenced today to 20 years in prison for exploiting a minor girl by enticing her to live-stream sexually explicit acts via the Internet in exchange for payment, U.S. Attorney Paul J.... Read More...
Colts Neck Man Pleads Guilty in $20M Ponzi Scheme
Sunday, 23 November 2014
TRENTON, NJ—A Colts Neck, New Jersey, man who defrauded dozens of investors today admitted operating a $20 million Ponzi scheme out of his Fair Haven, New Jersey office and Miami residence, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman announced. Louis J. Spina,... Read More...
Monmouth University Hosts Project Pride 2014
Sunday, 23 November 2014
Department of Corrections Program Promotes Responsibility in Alcohol and Other Drug Use Inmates will talk about wrong choices they have made and resulting consequences.  Monmouth University will host Project PRIDE (Promoting Responsibility in... Read More...
Thanksgiving Gas Prices Likely Lowest in Five Years
Sunday, 23 November 2014
Gas Price Slide Hits 57 Days as National Average Nears Four-Year Low The Week The national average price of gas has remained below $3.00 per gallon for 20days (through Friday), with more than three-quarters of U.S. gas stations now reporting prices... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Often Not Believed
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 22 November 2014
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), also called Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome, had Carl Miller of Georgetown, Ohio, and his doctors,... Read More...
IMAGE Imparted Concepts
by George Hancock-Stefan
Friday, 21 November 2014
I heard on the news that a baseball player, Giancarlo Stanton, received the highest salary that has ever been paid ($325 million over 13... Read More...
IMAGE Review - Interstellar
by David Prown
Friday, 21 November 2014
I was definitely not jonesing to see "Interstellar" as I'm not really a big special effects guy however I've always liked space movies. My son saw it... Read More...
IMAGE Take It From Snoopy
by Anne Mikolay
Thursday, 20 November 2014
Recently, I cleaned out a trunk full of ancient artifacts from my high school days and came across a little book titled “Happiness is a warm... Read More...
IMAGE Happy Birthday to a Group Very Special to Atlantic Highlands
by Jack Archibald
Thursday, 20 November 2014
This column typically avoids mentioning birthdays, as each of us is special and our birthday is something to be celebrated.  But a recent... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Mon Nov 24 @11:00AM - 01:00PM
Diabetes Awareness Day
Wed Nov 26 @ 9:30AM - 10:00AM
Baby Story Time Ages 10 – 24 months
Wed Nov 26 @10:30AM - 10:50AM
Toddler Story Time Ages 2 & 3
Thu Nov 27 @ 9:00AM - 11:00AM
Middletown Mayor Open Office Hours
Thu Nov 27 @ 3:15PM - 03:45PM
School Age Programs Grades K and up

joe_reynoldsI live in a small, quiet suburban town in New Jersey called Atlantic Highlands. It is situated along the shores of Sandy Hook Bay and found downstream from the hustle and bustle of lower Manhattan in New York City.

It was a hot, sunny Sunday afternoon with a mild breeze a few weeks ago that I uncovered a bombshell in this quiet community. I was outside clearing away the invasive Oriental Bittersweet from my backyard. With a pair of clippers in my hands, I was cutting back the bittersweet in a wooded corner of my property under a few Sassafras trees and near several large Mountain Laurel bushes when I spotted something strange. It was a small critter with a yellow-orange and tan shell on the ground. What the heck was this?

Looking closely, it turned out not to be one but two critters. Less than 10 feet away from me were a pair of Eastern Box Turtles mating. They were getting intimate on top of a pile of decaying leaves. What a shocker! I had to look twice to make sure I was seeing this scene correctly.

While a person's first reaction might be to snicker and sneer at the thought of a male and female Box Turtle getting it on in an individual's backyard, this was in fact a big deal to me. I mean come on, here was a real act of wild nature going on not far from my house. The ultimate celebration of life in the middle of suburbia!

box_turtles_1

I remember as a kid growing up near Barnegat Bay in South Jersey and finding quite a few Box Turtles. During the summer, I would notice them in nearby woodlands feeding on berries. Inevitably, one or two would find their way near my home. My parents would always enjoy the sight of seeing Box Turtles, but would never let me keep one as a pet. It was always best to keep wild animals wild I was told.

Many years later that good advice comes back to me. Stay back and do not touch the turtles. Let them be.

The sight of a breeding pair of Box Turtles is even more important today when you take into account that this radiant reptile is listed as a "species of special concern" by the NJ State Endangered and Nongame Species Program. Though not endangered, wildlife biologists consider the Box Turtle likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future. Despite the fact that Box Turtles are well known, their population is sadly declining throughout New Jersey.

The reasons for a diminishing Box Turtle population are many. First and foremost, though, is habitat destruction. Many roads now slice through once dense forested land. The demise of large tracts of woodlands due to over-development and poor planning has caused many Box Turtles to become isolated from a variety of food sources and potential mates.

According to the Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey, Box Turtles have very small home rangers. Their homeland is around 250 square yards or less. If a Box Turtle is removed from their territory and placed in an unfamiliar site, they may die while trying to find their way back home. Numerous Box Turtles die every year trying to cross roads in search of food, a mate, or trying to get back home. Box Turtles are diurnal, so they are most active during daylight hours when vehicle traffic is high.

box_turtles_2

Box Turtles are also highly sought after as pets. Lots of people seek out wild Box Turtles and illegally collect them for use as a pet or sell them for profit to local pet stores.

Even though Box Turtles can live up to 20 years in the wild, this native reptile is quickly becoming scarce primarily because these threats have put an enormous amount of stress on the species. What's more, the turtles are slow to reproduce because of the many obstacles they face in the wild. Box Turtles become sexual active at four to five years of age. The mating season begins in the spring and continues throughout summer to October, the time of year when many people are most active outdoors as well.

No doubt then, seeing a pair of boxies mating is my backyard was about the coolest thing I'd ever set my eyes on near my house. Despite all the obstacles, the need to breed was strong in this pair.

If all goes well, the female will deposit eggs in a hole by the end of the month. Eggs are laid in June and July. Females lay between 2 to 7 eggs in loose or sandy soil and sometimes even in lawns. Most hatching occurs in September. The next generation of Box Turtles will have gotten their start here in my backyard, not far the shores of Sandy Hook Bay, and located downstream from New York City.

For all its beauty and peacefulness, Box Turtles are no match for the destructive powers of humans. Here are some quick and easy ways you can help protect the Eastern Box Turtle from becoming endangered:

- Never remove a turtle from the wild.

- Never relocate a turtle in the wild, unless you see one trying to cross a road.  Help a turtle cross a road only if you can do so safely, and be sure to point it in the same direction that it was headed.

- Never return a pet turtle or rescued turtle to the wild, as they often contain viruses or bacteria that can do damage to a wild turtle population.

- Educate friends and family about the importance of observing – but not touching, disturbing or collecting – turtles in the wild.


For more information, pictures and year-round sightings of wildlife in or near Sandy Hook Bay, please check out my blog entitled, Nature on the Edge of New York City at http://natureontheedgenyc.blogspot.com/