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AHH 24-Hr. News

No Dunes or Beach Access Required for Monmouth County Beach Project
Saturday, 18 April 2015
TRENTON, NJ - The DEP and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will launch two major coastal construction projects Friday for Cape May and Monmouth counties. The Monmouth County project will make improvements coastal protection structures in the area of... Read More...
IMAGE GSP Interchange 109 Public Information Meeting on April 23
Saturday, 18 April 2015
April 23rd event will offer the public a chance to learn about proposed improvements at GSP Interchange 109 MIDDLETOWN, NJ - The New Jersey Turnpike Authority will host a Public Information Center in Middletown to present information about proposed... Read More...
4-H Clover Campaign set for April 22-May 3
Saturday, 18 April 2015
ALLENTOWN, NJ –Monmouth County 4-H is participating in the national spring 2015 4-H Paper Clover Campaign. Support the 4-H’ers by purchasing a clover at the Tractor Supply Company at 701 County Route 524. The spring 2015 4-H Paper Clover... Read More...
AAA Mid-Atlantic: Pump Prices Inch Up
Saturday, 18 April 2015
Cost of Crude Oil Hits 2015 High, Pushes Gas Prices Slightly Higher The Week The national average price for regular unleaded gasoline has inched up in recent days, as global crude oil prices rebounded to a new 2015 high.  Friday’s average... Read More...
IMAGE New York Man Sentence to 7 Years in Theft of Mortgage Payments
Saturday, 18 April 2015
Staten Island Man Stole More Than $187,000 for Mortgage Payments FREEHOLD, NJ - A Staten Island man was sentenced Friday to seven years in a New Jersey state prison for stealing more than $187,000 from a pair of homeowners over a 33-month period,... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Review - While We're Young
by David Prown
Saturday, 18 April 2015
So I hadn't been to the movies in several weeks found a time slot and "While We're Young" filled the slot. I was not excited to see this Ben... Read More...
IMAGE Carolinian with Bipolar Disorder Had Success
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 18 April 2015
According to the National Institutes of Health, bipolar disorder (formerly manic-depressive illness) is a “brain disorder causing unusual shifts in... Read More...
IMAGE Return of the Brownshirts
by Woody Zimmerman
Friday, 17 April 2015
In the 1930s, gangs of brown-shirted street thugs smashed Jewish shop-windows, terrorized voters at the polls, and generally raised hell all across... Read More...
IMAGE Skewed View - April 17, 2015
by Tom Brennan
Friday, 17 April 2015
The second thing should do before starting a carjacking business is learn how to drive a stick: http://bit.ly/1H2BdkM What's worse than losing your... Read More...
IMAGE Concluding the Gospel Twice
by George Hancock-Stefan
Thursday, 16 April 2015
On the classical music radio station, they had a program called False Conclusions.  The host presented a number of works that seem to end and... Read More...

Upcoming Events

joe_reynoldsSpring is coming on strong now. Everything seems to be growing and bursting forth in triumph. Along the water's edge in Lower New York Bay including Raritan Bay, Sandy Hook Bay, and the Navesink River, Horseshoe crabs are arising out of the water in great numbers to spawn.

The end of May and early June is the height of Horseshoe Crab spawning. Soon after the herring have migrated upstream to release their eggs, adult Horseshoe Crabs begin to magically appear out of the water at their favorite beaches or mud flats to produce another generation. The spawning season tends to peak at night around the new and full moons; and when water temperatures first rise above 55 degrees. These conditions let know the Horseshoe Crab that it's time to lay eggs.

For at least 350 million years, instinct takes over in the spring for the Horseshoe Crab. They travel on the bottom of the water, sometimes over hundreds of miles from the Continental Shelf, to arrive to coastal beaches to satisfy their need to breed.

Single females swim inshore around the tip of Sandy Hook or Breezy Point. They are followed by males. Wandering females stay unattached for only a short time. Males, which outnumber females by at least 5 to 1, will compete for a female's attention. The winner will latch onto the back-end of the female with their hook-like arms. As the female moves around the shallow waters of the bay making circular tracks in the sand, she will drag the male along. Once a nesting site has been settled on by the female Horseshoe crab, she will burrow into the wet sand and lay up to 1,000 eggs, which the male will fertilize. A single female Horseshoe Crab will lay eggs in three to ten nests sites within the inter-tidal zone.

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So if you plan on walking around the bay beaches and mud flats around Lower New York Bay over the next few weeks, watch out! As the Horseshoe Crabs spawn, they are sometimes hardly visible. All you might see is a large lump of sand or some strange marks on the beach. Look closely, though, as part of the male will show. You will see the crab's unmistakable body - a spiny long tail and even perhaps a horseshoe helmet-like shell. Brush away some sand and you might even feel the shell of the female too.

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Empty sand holes or depressions in the sand could indicate places where these bay creatures have laid their pale-green clusters of eggs. Leave them alone as well! If exposed to the air or the sun, the eggs will dry up and wither away. If all goes well, in about two weeks, the eggs will hatch will tiny newly born Horseshoe Crabs that will bring fresh life to Lower New York Bay.

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Watch where you step and if you see a mating pair of Horseshoe Crabs, please do not pick them up. If you handle a single Horseshoe crab, please do not pick up the crab by its fragile tail. The delicate hinge connecting the tail to the body will not support the crab's weight and the tail will break off. A Horseshoe Crab will then lose an important tool to navigate in the water and on the beach.

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It is best to just let the crabs be for the next few weeks. Let them get on with their job of laying eggs and propagating new life, as they have been doing for over 350 million years. This is an important occasion for Horseshoe Crabs. Spring spawning time is the very backbone of their survival.