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AHH 24-Hr. News

IMAGE Jersey Shore Partnership Makes a Splash with Big Wave Anchor Award
Tuesday, 16 September 2014
PHOTO: ( left to right):  Robert Mainberger,President Jersey Shore Partnership; John Szeliga, Chairman of the Jersey Shore Partnership... Read More...
IMAGE CPC Behavioral Healthcare Opens Freehold Counseling Center
Tuesday, 16 September 2014
Behavioral Health, Addiction Recovery, Counseling & Education Services Offer Hope and Help for Monmouth Families Freehold, NJ –... Read More...
IMAGE "Through the Middle” with Artists Laura Sharp Wilson and David French
Tuesday, 16 September 2014
IMAGE: Laura  Sharp Wilson & David French Collaboration Opening Reception, September 27 Atlantic Highlands, NJ - On Saturday,... Read More...
IMAGE Red Bank Crop Hunger Walk Set for Oct. 19
Tuesday, 16 September 2014
PHOTO: The Food Pantry operated by the Area Association of Community Churches and located at the Atlantic Highlands United Methodist Church is one of... Read More...
4th Annual “The Endless Summer Walk: bay2ocean30”
Monday, 15 September 2014
Asbury Park, NJ - The FreeWalkers, a social network of long-distance walkers, aims to extend the summer of 2014 for the fourth year in a row by... Read More...

Columns

IMAGE Hoy for the Hall of Fame
by Daniel J. Vance
Saturday, 13 September 2014
I guess every year you'll just have to get used to reading about William Elsworth “Dummy” Hoy, a deaf professional baseball player from... Read More...
IMAGE 9/11 - An Historic Shift
by Jack Archibald
Friday, 12 September 2014
Wherever you walk in lower Manhattan on September 11, there is always some quiet reflection going on.  Most of the workers are quietly going... Read More...
IMAGE Skewed View - September 12, 2014
by Tom Brennan
Friday, 12 September 2014
Here's a handy info graph that shows what diseases kills most of us and how much we give to those diseases: http://bit.ly/1lLNoKL "12 Year-old... Read More...
IMAGE Could Someone Else Pray?
by George Hancock-Stefan
Thursday, 11 September 2014
E. M. Bounds starts his book on prayer by telling us that the world will never know the things that were altered through prayer - Elijah praying and... Read More...
IMAGE The Four Rs of Education
by Anne Mikolay
Thursday, 11 September 2014
Now that summer vacation has ended, I've seen lots of little children heading off to school, some with neat, new clothes and clean backpacks, others... Read More...

Upcoming Events

Wed Sep 17 @ 9:30AM - 10:00AM
Baby Story Time Ages 10 – 24 months
Wed Sep 17 @ 9:30AM - 11:00AM
Gymboree Play and Music! - AH Library
Wed Sep 17 @10:30AM - 10:50AM
Toddler Story Time Ages 2 & 3
Wed Sep 17 @11:00AM -
Making "Segmented" Wooden Bowls
Thu Sep 18 @ 3:15PM - 03:45PM
School Age Programs Grades K and up

danvance_120"People look at you sometimes like you're crazy," said 40-year-old Mara Mittelman of Carney's Point, New Jersey, in a telephone interview. "But I've always been honest about having fibromyalgia. I just want people to know that (people with it) aren't crazy and it's a real condition."

A National Institutes of Health website defines fibromyalgia as a "common and chronic disorder" involving widespread soft tissue pain and tenderness. It can also cause fatigue, cognitive and memory problems, headaches, and sensitivity to noise, lights, and temperature. People with fibromyalgia often are accused of making up symptoms or told their symptoms are in their head. But the condition is real and in some people meets the criteria for a disability. It affects five million Americans over 18, mostly women.

Said Mittelman, "In 1998, I was a medical assistant and my shoulders were killing me. I was constantly having to lie down at lunch to relax my back. I couldn't figure out why everything hurt all the time. I saw a neurosurgeon because of the pain, and he said four of my vertebrae were compressing, and two were dangerous. I ended up having a cervical fusion."

Months later, she was regressing in terms of pain, but this time of a different type. At age 25, she no longer had any energy and her entire body hurt. In August 1998, a doctor diagnosed fibromyalgia. Her symptoms would improve slightly over time to where in 2008 she was able to complete her associate's degree.

Even so, fibromyalgia still affects her. "For example, I worked in the garden the other day and am still in pain. When choosing an activity, I have to consider I might be in pain (for days). So I have to ask myself whether doing an activity is worth it."

Mittelman now works as a part-time apartment complex leasing agent. She can't return to her job as a medical assistant because the stress experienced there triggers severe fibromyalgia-related flareups even while taking medication. To cope with flareups, which can last a week, she prays, talks herself through tough stretches, reads, and crochets.

She said, "If somebody told me they had a cure for fibromyalgia, I would be first in line. By the same token, because of it I am the person I am today. It has made me stronger because I have had to fight through it."

Contact: danieljvance.com [Blue Valley Sod and Palmer Bus Service make this column possible.]