ImageWhen I was a little girl, I wanted to be Marcia Brady from television’s The Brady Bunch. Marcia, as played by Maureen McCormick, was adorable, popular, successful, and incredibly lucky. Nothing kept Marcia down. She was popped in the nose with a basketball, and lived to tell about it, and her personal crisis with braces lasted a mere episode. When Marcia changed her hairstyle, so did I. When she appeared in a quilted, pink robe, I asked for the same robe for Christmas – and got it! When she and her television siblings released a holiday album, I played the record over and over on my portable record player. To me, and countless other pre-teens, Marcia Brady was perfection in a turtleneck sweater.

Maureen McCormick is about to push her alter-ego off her pedestal.

Marcia, Marcia, Marcia! Say it ain’t so!

In her soon-to-be-released book, Here’s The Story: Surviving Marcia Brady and Finding My True Voice (on book shelves Tuesday, October 21st), Maureen McCormick reveals, among other things, her addiction to cocaine and struggle with depression, her relationships with Michael Jackson, Steve Martin, and television brother, Barry Williams, and wild parties at The Playboy Mansion. The book dispels any confusion fans may have had: Maureen McCormick is not Marcia Brady.

Some fans may be shocked at Marcia’s…Maureen’s…tell-all revelations, and might feel a bit let down by the supposedly perfect star. The viewers are responsible for that.  Conditioned to believe that what we see on television is real (perhaps because we sometimes want it to be real), the viewers turned Maureen McCormick into Marcia Brady. On some level, we believed that Maureen McCormick was as sweet and innocent as the character she played.

Though Maureen McCormick’s book reveals behavior that may be foreign to Marcia Brady’s fans, proving beyond a doubt that the actress and her ever-perfect counterpart are not one in the same, Maureen’s honesty illustrates that, despite her many trials, she really isn’t that much different from the rest of us. We shouldn’t be so shocked. Maybe at some point in her past, Maureen McCormick looked in the mirror, and didn’t much like what she saw, and subsequently made some mistakes – just like the rest of us.

In her press release for her upcoming publication, Maureen McCormick said: “As a teenager, I had no idea that few people are everything they present to the outside world.” That’s a lesson everybody must learn; fortunately, most of us don’t have to do so with the whole world watching, like she did.

Am I disappointed to discover Maureen McCormick isn’t as perfect and innocent as Marcia Brady? I suppose so. Do I still like the actress? Yes. At fifty-two years of age, Maureen McCormick remains poised, talented, and likeable. When I see her face, and hear her still-perky voice, I remember what it was like to be a carefree kid, and just for a second, I’m once again a little girl in a quilted robe, happily sitting in front of the television on Friday nights.

Though she isn’t perfect, Maureen McCormick gave me a perfect memory.