anne mikolay 2012 120The day after Thanksgiving, Black Friday, has traditionally marked the beginning of the Christmas shopping season. Those who detect a definite lack of seasonal good will toward men in Black Friday's  “on your mark, get set, GO!” mentality pretty much ignore the day. Of course, such anti-hustle and bustle people, like me, have been whining about Christmas commercialism for years. Who can blame us when pumpkins and Christmas decorations sit side-by-side on department store shelves? Those who thrive on Black Friday's competitive “thrill of the chase” view the shopping frenzy as part of their annual holiday festivities. Well, Black Friday enthusiasts, rejoice! Here comes yet another holiday dedicated to the almighty dollar: Greed Thursday

Yes! Welcome to Greed Thursday, aka Thanksgiving Day. The credit for Greed Thursday (excluding its rather unimaginative name, my sole contribution) goes to the retail industry. In an effort to boost holiday sales, Thanksgiving, previously known for its turkey, stuffing, and pumpkin pie, will henceforth be the day bargain hunters get a jump on Black Friday. Thus, to assist passionate holiday shoppers in jump starting the traditional jump-start, here is a list of retailers opening at 8:00 pm on Thanksgiving Day: Walmart, Target, Sears, Macys, JCPenney, Kohls; Old Navy will open at 9:00 am while Best Buy opens at 6:00 pm.

Criticism aside, I am not naïve enough to believe a happy, little Norman Rockwell world exists. In fact, it's a Scrooge mindset that enhances our economy, and we all enjoy the benefits. Thus, retailers can't truly be blamed for attempting to squeeze as much profit as possible into a holiday shopping season. That being said, I don't comprehend the logic. Of course, I was not an economics major in college and admittedly may be missing the obvious, but if shoppers race into the stores and boost sales on Thanksgiving Day, won't their absence in the stores on Black Friday negatively impact that day's sales? Aren't we sort of running in place here?

On second thought, I do share responsibility for Greed Thursday. We all do. This age of “give it to me now” self-entitlement enabled select retailers to successfully open for business last Thanksgiving Day. Even more will confidently do so this year. Retailers know their customers well. Some consumers will do anything to save a buck, including pitching tents outside electronics stores to be the first inside to purchase the latest electronics. Thus, we can't complain about the seasonal commercialism we created. Retailers fix their focus on the bottom line and so do we. It's just the nature of the beast.

If you don't mind Christmas shopping on Thanksgiving Day, go for it! But Greed Thursday is not for me. I'll stay behind; somebody has to do the whining!