anne mikolay 2012 120On a recent visit to the grocery store, I found myself in the cookie aisle surrounded by Oreos in more varieties than I thought possible, rainbow chocolate chips, brownie stuffed chocolate chips, and oatmeal raisin cookies with or without icing, and I suddenly thought, “all I want is a Fudgetown cookie!”

For those of you who don't know (you poor things!), Fudgetown cookies, flower-shaped chocolate sandwich cookies with chocolate cream centers, were produced back in the 70s by a company called Burrys. After a trying day in school, there was nothing like coming home to a glass of milk and some Fudgetown cookies!

Fudgetown cookies have gone the way of glass soda bottles, Maryjane shoes, and a government that works.

Come to think of it, a lot of my favorite childhood goodies are long gone: Betty Crocker Boston Cream Pie Mix, Nestles chocolate bars, individual packages of Drakes Oatmeal cookies or Hostess cupcakes (which, by the way, were ten cents back then at the local A&P), Sugar Daddy pops, and Turkish Taffy. For the record, I did more than eat sweets in my youth; I also frequented Burger King where one dollar bought me a cheeseburger, fries, and coke. Things were so much better back then!

At least I think they were; our present troubled times may have me viewing the past through rose colored glasses. All things are relevant to one's own time, posing the philosophical question: is the past truly better than the present, or does nostalgia erase the negative? After-all, we were younger years ago, had less responsibilities and less stress. No wonder we think yesterday was better. We could gobble up Fudgetown cookies and not worry about how to pay for the next box. We trusted the grown-ups (and the government) to take care of us because that was their job. The world turned, and worry belonged to the older folks. Alas, the age-old cycle of life pushed us forward, and we are now the older, albeit somewhat baffled, generation. We want security. We want to know whom we can rely on. We want a president and a government who puts the people before politics. We want to know: why does everything have to be so difficult?

That's a question nobody will ever answer satisfactorily.

I don't know about you, but I sometimes long for the past, regardless of whether or not it really was a simpler time. I'm tired of bad news, uncertainty, ineffective political talking heads, and a media that bombards us round the clock with endless tragedies and propaganda.

Just gimme a Fudgetown cookie, leave me alone, and let me wear my rose colored glasses for a while.